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Classic Wings Edition · Volume 24

Issue 111 ( #3 )

Classic Wings Issue #111
  • LEWIS LEGEND
  • THE BATTLE OF BALALAE
  • MYSTERY MUSEUM - THE MUSEUM OF THE AIR FORCE OF THE NORTHERN FLEET
  • HARRY TATE - THE ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY R.E.8
  • MYSTERY AIRCRAFT - KZ-II TRAINER
  • In a packed pre air show edition we have some superb articles for your enjoyment. The Lewis Air Collection's magnificent Mossie flew in January and is finished in a spectacular scheme. We discuss the fascinating history of this aircraft from its time in NZ, through to its clandestine operations over Sth America. Thereafter it went through some tough times and was fortunate to survive. Viewing Gavin Conroy's magnificent air to airs, we are all thankful it did! Other WWII derelicts have not been so fortunate, slowly returning to nature and facing a constant threat from the scrap metal merchants. This is to change for several very rare examples of Imperial Japan's stalwarts which have been rescued from more than seven decades of neglect and moved to within sight of salvation. They are however not totally 'out of the woods' yet, with a final (man-made) obstacle to be overcome. One of the much maligned, but ironically much employed aircraft from the Great War is featured. The Royal Aircraft Factory R.E.8 was designed to provide a stable platform for reconnaissance, that it did. However it was soon to be feared more by its own crew than the enemy. However despite some horrendous early losses through accidents and enemy fighters it did go on to earn a degree of respect. Finally, an elegant interwar trainer is the Mystery Aeroplane, and it certainly proved to be one for most readers!:: More about this issue »

    Issue 110 ( #2 )

    Classic Wings Issue #110
  • HORTEN’S BAT WINGED SHIP
  • MURMANSK MESSERSCHMITT
  • OUR LAST MYSTERY AIRCRAFT WAS A...VOUGHT (O SERIES) CORSAIR.
  • BATTLING BETTY-The MITSUBISHI G4M HAMAKI
  • KILLER KITTYHAWK
  • AIRSHOWS
  • In this issue we continue our coverage of wreck recovery, detailing the discovery, known history and condition of a combat veteran Bf109 raised from a Russian lake – they are still out there! Another far more advanced Luftwaffe aircraft is looked at as we focus on the sole surviving Horten Ho 229 fighter/bomber which was being developed at wars’ end. The stealth qualities of this futuristic jet powered flying wing have been much debated and we detail the investigation into this claim by the Smithsonian’s conservation team, this just part of the balancing act to conserve and display the deteriorated and fragile airframe. Another fighter which features is the Editors own P-40 project which he has now decided deserves a new home. In this article the aircraft’s history and current status is discussed. An earlier type is our Mystery Aircraft; the Vought Corsair biplane had a long and distinguished career, not only with the US Navy/Marines, but in a number of foreign air arms where the type saw considerable action in the role of scout, fighter and light bomber. Bombing was the main role of the Japanese G4M Betty and in our article the type’s development and combat history is detailed, as are the few secured surviving, but incomplete airframes. This will hopefully change for the better- and all going well we will bring you more on this exciting possibility in the next issue.:: More about this issue »

    Issue 109 ( #1 )

    Classic Wings Issue #109
  • RELICS FROM THE NORTH
  • Our Last Mystery Aircraft was a...FAIREY III
  • SIEBEL Si 204 SERIES SURVIVORS
  • THE LAST BULLDOG!
  • COLLINGS P-38
  • Airshows
  • This issue is packed with goodies, particularly for those which like a bit of a treasure hunt! Some absolute gems have recently been recovered from the cold waters of the Far North, some we can identify now but one will have to wait until next time. Our other features focus on rare types as well. Following on from our articles in the previous issue, we look at the few remaining survivors from the Siebel 204 stable, most of these situated in Eastern Europe. Only two of the 1930s state of the art fighters, the Bristol Bulldog, remain however a gentleman in the US has decided a representative of the type needs to be in the air and tells of the journey to achieve this. Fraught with obstacles he is nevertheless embracing that Bulldog spirit and is determined to succeed. As you will witness through the article, there is no doubt he will! Our mystery machine is the versatile Fairey III, an aircraft which was could be used in either land or sea plane configuration with little fuss. Used in a variety of roles and by several nations it served with distinction and was particularly noted for some impressive long distance flights. Sadly only one example survives, but fortunately it is a famous one which stands in tribute to the fortitude of the aviators of the time who were not afraid to meet a challenge head on. The remarkable Collings Foundation has added a rare bird to their flying stable, a P-38 which has spent much of its recent life on museum display, but is now out and about educating the younger generations. There is of course our usual selection of eye candy, with spectacular images of some of the most iconic aircraft gracing air show skies.:: More about this issue »


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